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Both interior and exterior video of a Tornado hit

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Zathrus, May 5, 2017.

  1. Zathrus

    Zathrus Vindicator Member

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    Hello all,
    I stumbled into this video today of a Tornado that occurred a few years ago in southern Indiana. Few videos I have seen of tornado impact have captured the destruction on video as clearly as these cameras did from both the interior and exterior.

    This tornado occurred in March of 2012 in Henryville Indiana. It was an F4 that roared through town destroying their high school, homes and many other things. It did produce some fatalities unfortunately in other parts of town but nobody was injured at the school.

    The local high school captured some pretty good video of just how fast the total destruction can be even when grazed by its less powerful outer F3 force winds (175mph) which are furthest from the center of circulation yet still part of that main circulation.... the outer wall so to speak.

    While this high school is in a small town in a rural area, they were equipped with a very high end security camera system that recorded continuously from numerous cameras in 720p into a dvr server. It was donated to the school apparently by a company that builds security camera systems. This system was robust enough that it caught much of the damage being done to the high school... impressive.

    They rebuilt the high school the following year, and the camera system donor came back and installed a brand new system in their new school.

    One of the area's local TV news stations assembled several videos from the security camera server at the high school. After viewing it, I thought it did a good job of giving a first person view of just how powerful these things are. The damage being shown here is being done by the outer wall of the tornado, the center core would have left little standing with a direct hit.

    They have embedding blocked but you can see it on youtube with the link in the block


    The video below is from just inside the gymnasium
    What is astonishing is how fast a whole lot of stuff vanished when it grazed that gymnasium.
     
    #1 Zathrus, May 5, 2017
    Last edited: May 5, 2017
  2. Sylak

    Sylak Vindicator Member

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    A nuke, That's when it look like. Man. Even the Reapers are not that quick in taking places apart. No english word can caption my reaction, so : TABARNAC! Yep sorry for the searing ;-) This is scary. The school look so clean and pristine, it's a shame.
     
  3. Zathrus

    Zathrus Vindicator Member

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    Yes well I am happy to tell you they completely rebuilt this school and re-opened it one year later.
    The company that had donated that "robust" security camera system for free which is what caught this footage... came back and installed a brand new camera system in the new school.

    As camera's get better, get fewer and fewer moving parts making them tougher we shall see more and more of this type of video that remains relatively clear through the entire event.

    It does give you some feeling of how fast and ferocious they are if they hit.
     
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  4. Sylak

    Sylak Vindicator Member

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    f4 is significant. wind can be destructive as hell. I hope they don,t experience those tornado too much, rebuilding stuff every few year is kind of sad.
     
  5. Zathrus

    Zathrus Vindicator Member

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    I am currently trying to gather data for some research I am doing on that very subject.

    One thing that appears to be happening (appearances can be deceiving) is straight line wind damage along with large F3+ tornado's tracking on the ground for more than 20 miles seems to be increasing.
    I am collecting years of data to compile into some kind of picture.

    What appears to be an increase could be due to better equipment, more radar sites, more tornado chasers, etc. Therefore I am staying with NWS recorded damage data only since they would have recorded that both thoroughly & consistently through the years. They always go investigate significant storm damage to check whether it is straight line wind damage or a tornado.

    In today's world, due to the high resolution Doppler radars at multiple sites, they pretty much know what they are going to go look at before they get there. Tornado's are very distinct and easy to see with Doppler radar.

    The high resolution radars can tell them how wide the funnel is from ground to cloud base.
     
  6. Aakek

    Aakek Galactic Overlord
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    My mother lived in Joplin MO at the time of the EF5 in 2011. Tons of images before, after, and 5 years later. Her house was just at the edge of the major damage. It was very badly damaged but not a complete flattening like everything 200 yards away.

    A 4 minute drive off the interstate took me over an hour.. not due to damage blocking my path but the damage erased everything in its path so I was lost due to no landmarks to guide me.
     
  7. Zathrus

    Zathrus Vindicator Member

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    Yes that F5... actually all F5 tornado's look absolutely evil and nasty.
    I watched video following the path of that F5 in Joplin. When ever it crossed roads, highways etc. it was so powerful, it had ripped the pavement off the ground... the highway was a dirt road where the tornado passed.

    It is hard to imagine the fury within an F5. The old scale listed an F5 as winds of 261 to 318mph (420 to 512kph) I hear this scale is being revised.

    The official definition of an F5:

    F5 - 261-318mph - Incredible damage. Strong frame houses leveled off foundations and swept away; automobile-sized missiles fly through the air in excess of 100 meters (109 yds); trees debarked; incredible phenomena will occur.
     
  8. Sylak

    Sylak Vindicator Member

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    It,s Scary, we had a mini tornado lastly like 30 sec, 1.5-2.0km long by 500 meter. and it destroyed or patio set. Big tree in our neighbourhood were torn down. and it was minor. a F5, damn scary.
     
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